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Sunday, January 25, 2015

What Is Humanity’s Greatest Invention?

Yuval Noah Harari, author of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, offers an answer: Humanity’s greatest invention is religion, which does not mean necessarily mean belief in gods. Rather, religion is any system of norms and values that is founded on a belief in superhuman laws. Some religions, such as Islam, Christianity and Hinduism, believe […]

An interesting read via The Dish


Save Images Directly to Amazon Cloud Drive with This Extension

Save Images Directly to Amazon Cloud Drive with This Extension


Chrome: Amazon Prime customers can save an unlimited amount of photos to Amazon Cloud Drive , which makes it a good spot for images. With the Save to Cloud Drive Chrome Extension, you can save any image to Amazon with a right-click.


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An interesting read via Lifehacker


An Artist Created a Stop-Motion Short Film Using 1139 Light Paintings


Light painting is the process of using light and long exposure photography to create almost electric-looking works of art. This bit of light trickery has been used by artists and hobbyists to create stunning visual works as well as recreating the proton streams from GhostBusters . But Darren Pearson, also known as Darius Twin, instead created "Lightspeed," a stop-motion short film made up of 1139 separate light paintings.


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An interesting read via Gizmodo


Remains Of The Day

Oliver Morton, pausing before a reconstructed gorgosaurus at the Manchester Museum, marvels that “absolutely all that remains of that creature’s life is this scarred skeleton”: We often think of fossils as being in some way ancestral relatives, if not of humans, then of some other aspect of nature, parts of some great unfolding story. But […]

An interesting read via The Dish


San Francisco ponders letting luxury property developers take away symbolic "public spaces"

Like many cities, SF asks fancy property developers to create "public spaces" in their buildings to make up for parks and other public sites they displace, and these are usually a joke, hidden away far in the buildings' depths and deliberately hidden from the public. Read the rest



An interesting read via Boing Boing